Mbukwa addressing ex-miners Malawi Southern Africa 

Southern Africa Trust addresses obstacles facing former mineworkers

The Southern Africa Trust will host a stakeholders meeting and outreach aimed at tackling unclaimed benefits for ex-miners in Malawi on September 6-7. More than R5.7 billion is owed to former mineworkers in social security and compensation benefits. These are mineworkers who were employed in the South African mining industry and hail from South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, Mozambique, Botswana, Malawi and Zimbabwe. The meeting and outreach aims to address changing practice and historical injustices with regards to recruitment of former mineworkers. Please follow and like us:

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albinisms Southern Africa Southern. Africa 

African countries must turn the tide on violence against people with albinisms

A United Nations high level Meeting on people with albinism in Africa which will take place in Pretoria, South Africa on 8 November is a crucial opportunity to end discrimination and violence against people with albinism across the continent, Amnesty International said today. Please follow and like us:

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Angola: Trial of 15 activists after five months in detention a travesty of justice

The trial of 15 peaceful activists who have been held unlawfully for almost five months and charged with preparing “rebellion and a coup attempt” will be a crucial test for the independence of Angola’s judiciary, said Amnesty International ahead of their expected court appearance on 16 November 2015.

The 15 men were arrested and detained by Angolan security forces between 20 and 24 June 2015 in Luanda after attending a meeting to discuss politics and governance concerns. Amnesty International considers them to be prisoners of conscience and it is calling for their immediate and unconditional release.

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Angola: Independence celebrations marred by crackdown on human rights

Angola IndependencePresident José Eduardo dos Santos’s tightening stranglehold on freedom of expression in Angola and his government’s decades of fear and repression will cast an indelible stain on the 40th anniversary of the country’s independence, said Amnesty International today.

As dignitaries and foreign leaders gather in the capital Luanda to mark four decades of independence, at least 16 activists continue to languish in Angolan jails.

“40 years after independence, many Angolans still have a long way before they realise their human rights freedoms. Those who express views that differ from those of the regime are subjected to brutal treatment. Independence should also be about people being allowed to freely express themselves,” said Muleya Mwananyanda, Amnesty International’s Deputy Director for Southern Africa.

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Victory for women’s rights in southern Africa as Botswana Court of Appeal finds women can inherit under customary law

 GABORONE – The fight for women’s rights in Botswana took a major step forward today when the Court of Appeal in Ramantele v Mmusi and Others upheld the right of four sisters to inherit their family homestead, rejecting the argument that under Ngwaketse customary law only sons were allowed to inherit it.

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President dos Santos is “missing”

President Jose Eduardo dos Santos left Angola on June 26th for a private visit to Barcelona in Spain, where he is reported to have travelled in the past for medical attention. With his stay overseas now exceeding 44 days, more than the duration of any previous visit, his absence has come under scrutiny in Angola. While he may well reappear in public soon, his absence and rumours about his health have sparked a debate about his succession. It is not unusual for the 70-year-old to be out of the public…

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Mozambique: Exposing poor practices by Vale and Rio Tinto

Research by Southern Africa Resource Watch (SARW) – Coal Versus Communities in Mozambique

Brazil’s Companhia Vale do Rio Doce (Vale) and the Anglo-Australian multinational Rio Tinto JOHANNESBURG: On January 10th, the activities of two of the world’s largest mining companies – Brazil’s Vale and Anglo-Australian multinational Rio Tinto – in Mozambique hit the headlines for all the wrong reasons. Enraged at the way they have been resettled, hundreds of protestors blocked the railway line that transports coal from the massive new mines in Tete Province to the coast – demanding that the companies fulfil their obligations to the thousands of people who had been moved from their lands to make way for the mines.

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