Africa Senegal West Africa World 

France returns 19th century sword to Senegal

France has returned to Senegal a historical sword taken from the country many years ago. The sabre, is a type of backsword with a curved blade. It belonged to an Islamic ruler in Senegal. Owned by a 19th Century Islamic scholar and ruler the sword had been in a French museum until now. France said the return of the artifact was part of a commitment to return to its former West African colonies significant items of their cultural heritage. A ceremony took place in Senegal’s capital Dakar where the French…

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Africa West Africa World 

Francophone West Africa seeks ‘financial freedom’ from France

For decades Francophone nations in West Africa have had the management of their currency done in France. Their financial reserves have always been planned and controlled from France despite gaining independence many years ago. A model where these eight former colonies of France had their foreign-exchange accumulation kept at the French Treasury could soon change. Benin’s President Patrice Talon has revealed that the eight-member nations of the West African Monetary Union “unanimously agree” to end the practice. He said in an interview with Radio France Internationale that “I can’t give…

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Africa Ghana West Africa World 

Ghana’s underwater forest wood could rebuild Notre-Dame

A Ghanaian company tasked to harvest wood stuck under Ghana’s Volta Lake has revealed that the wood could help rebuild the burnt Notre-Dame Cathedral in France. Massive tropical trees were submerged beneath the Lake since 1965 at the time of the construction of Ghana’s Akosombo Dam. Preserved from decay by the lake’s bog-like conditions, the wood is considered strong enough to rebuild the iconic Cathedral. Kete Krachi Timber Recovery is reported by the BBC to have submitted a proposal to the French government. It argues that using wood from Lake…

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Africa Senegal World 

Woman’s unfailing love for husband still in coma for 37 years

The story of Bernadette Adams, the wife of former French footballer, Jean-Pierre Adams has resonated with many around the world. Bernadette’s love for her husband who is still in coma for over three decades now continues to excite and marvel many. Her husband’s life was brutally turned upside down in 1982 when then 34 years he walked into a Lyon hospital for some routine surgery. Jean-Pierre Adams had gone to the hospital to correct a troublesome knee but he left not able to talk, walk or move any of his…

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Africa North Africa World 

Morocco: King Mohammed VI ill, suffers viral lung infection

The monarch of Morocco, King Mohammed VI has reportedly suffered a viral lung infection. His doctors have now asked him to take a long rest to recover. The illness forced him to miss a remembrance ceremony in Paris for France’s late president Jacques Chirac. An official statement from the palace said on Sunday the 56-year-old monarch, was unable to the commemoration event for Chirac, who died last week aged 86. Last year King Mohammed VI underwent heart surgery. He has been in power since 1999 when he took over from…

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Africa World 

Former French president, Jacques Chirac dies at 86

Jacques Chirac, the former French president whose later years were blighted by corruption scandals, has died aged 86. “President Jacques Chirac died this morning surrounded by his family, peacefully,” his son-in-law told the French news agency AFP. Mr Chirac served two terms as French president and took his country into the single European currency. The French National Assembly observed a minute’s silence in his memory. Jean-Claude Juncker, the president of the European Commission and former Luxembourg premier, said he was “moved and devastated” to learn the news. “Europe is not…

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How To Talk To Rwandan Rulers: First Flatter Them, And Then Hit Hard With Truth

By: Dr. David Himbara Managing Directors of IMF are supposed to be dull and boring economists obsessed with balancing countries’ books. Not Christine Lagarde. A former finance minister in France, she is a clever political operator. She proved this in her visit to Rwanda, the high mark of which was her speech in Rwandan parliament on January 27, 2015. Her strategy was simple – first flatter the Rwandan rulers and then hit them hard with gospel truth. Take this early praise in her speech: “Today Rwanda can take pride in…

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20 years on, France confronts Rwandan genocide

 Captain Pascal SimbikangwaThe first French trial of a Rwandan accused of involvement in the genocide of 1994 opened in Paris on Tuesday. The Rwandan justice minister called it a “positive sign”, while the plaintiffs hailed it as a “historic” event.

He appeared in the court room in his wheelchair.

54-year-old Pascal Simbikangwa (pictured, above), a paraplegic since 1986, is charged with complicity in genocide and crimes against humanity in Rwanda. He stands accused of inciting and organising the massacres, which resulted in 800,000 deaths in just 100 days, from April to July 1994.

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Zero Dark Mali

Rebels in Maliby Pepe Escobar

The imperialial juggernaut is once again on a roll in North Africa, with France in the lead. Secular-run Algeria had “better get its US$50 billion in reserves out of Western banks as soon as possible.” But overwhelming arms do not guarantee victory. “The French are on their way to meet the American fate in both Iraq and Afghanistan.”

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The Great Nothingness of Libya, Two Years After Muammar Gaddafi

Gaddaffi's BodyThe notion of a “Libya” has ceased to have any meaningful practical application. As a concept that either refers to some degree of national unity, an imagined community, sovereignty, or the exercise of authority by a state over the territory within its borders, “Libya” has been driven back to the time when it had yet to become formalized as a concept.

 

Those once celebrated as “rebels” and “revolutionaries” — by Obama, NATO states, UN bodies, Western media, and a range of liberal imperialist opinion along with those “socialists” who, after an extended period of internalized structural adjustment now model their thinking to better accord with neoliberal principles — are rarely if ever held up now as paragons of the “better future” that was to come. Visions, as in hallucinations and delusions, of the better that would come once Gaddafi was dutifully executed, abounded in the politically prepubescent writings of an “Arab Spring.”

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