Development OP-ED 

How Can Africa Develop a Culture of Sceptical Inquiry?

While there is a critical need for sceptical rationality in Africa, it has not been such a potent force in the region. Sceptical viewpoints are seldom visible in everyday talks and discussions, in public and national debates, in the mainstream media, in scholarly and popular literature. The mistaken belief that sceptical rationality is a Western idea persists. The dearth of these ideas is evident especially in discussions that are related to culture, religion, and tradition. Issues are presented as if questioning them is immaterial and of no consequence – that…

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Nigeria WitchCraft Nigeria 

Nigeria: Three Children Tortured for Witchcraft in Cross River State

A local non-governmental organization, the Basic Rights Counsel Initiative (BRCI), in Calabar has just released horrific images of three children who were tortured for witchcraft in Cross River State in Southern Nigeria. Grace 3, Lillian 5, and Juliet 13 narrowly escaped death after their accusers tried to extract confessions from them. According to local sources, the parents of Grace, Lillian and Juliet are dead. So the three children have until recently been living with their grandmother. The grandmother has been ill for some time. She has AIDS and accused the…

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Atheist Africa You and Your Family 

The Fate of Non Believers: Understanding the Challenges to Atheism in Africa

By Leo Igwe My main task in this piece is to answer the question: Why is it difficult and sometimes dangerous to be an atheist in Africa? In answering this question, I outline the risks and difficulties that non theists face and how they play out in everyday life. I draw from the experiences of atheists in Nigeria, Ghana, and Zambia in answering this question and in supplying materials for further discussion and reflection. Atheists across Africa face personal, social, economic, state and organizational challenges. Personal Challenges: What kind of…

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Tean Pregnancy in Sierra Leone West Africa 

Sierra Leone: Continued pregnancy ban in schools and failure to protect rights is threatening teenage girls’ futures

Sierra Leone must lift a deeply discriminatory ban on visibly pregnant girls attending school and taking exams, which continues to entrench gender inequality in the country and puts thousands of teenage girls’ futures at risk, Amnesty International said today, a year on from its report on the issue. “The prohibition on visibly pregnant girls attending mainstream schools and taking exams is hopelessly misguided, and is doing nothing to address the root causes of Sierra Leone’s high teenage pregnancy rate, which surged during the devastating Ebola crisis, and remains high despite…

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EXCLUSIVE! How Sierra Leone Fought Ebola With TB Joshua’s ‘Anointing Water’

TB JoshuaWhen Nigerian ‘Prophet’ T.B. Joshua controversially claimed in August 2014 that his ‘Anointing Water’ had the ability to cure the deadly Ebola virus which had ravaged several West African countries, the declaration was met with both doubt and derision. 

However, a prominent Sierra Leonean politician has sensationally claimed that the contentious arrival of 4,000 bottles of Joshua’s water to her nation was the key to the eventual decline of the incurable disease. 

Mrs Fatmata Kargbo, the Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Sierra Leone, gave the startling revelation in Lagos, Nigeria at The Synagogue, Church Of All Nations (SCOAN) on Sunday 1st November 2015.


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Sierra Leone: Ebola regulations and other laws must not be used to curtail freedom of expression and assembly

EbolaSierra Leone should stop using emergency regulations brought in to combat Ebola as a pretext to restrict freedom of expression and peaceful assembly, Amnesty International said today.

“Now that Ebola cases are reducing and schools have re-opened, the government should immediately review the State of Emergency provisions and ensure that only provisions strictly required to fight the Ebola epidemic remain in effect. Rights to freedom of expression and peaceful assembly must not be unnecessarily or disproportionately curtailed, ’’ said Sabrina Mahtani, Amnesty International’s West Africa researcher.


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